Building the Overarm Blade Guard and Dust Collector
Page 2
by Gordon J. Sampson


Procedure

The procedure for making the overhead blade guard and dust collector is divided into six parts:

  1. Parts List
  2. Cutting and drilling the Lexan blade guard
  3. Assembling the Lexan blade guard
  4. Cutting and drilling the 1"aluminum square tubing
  5. Cutting and drilling the 1"x 1/8"aluminum
  6. Assembling the Lexan blade guard to the aluminum support mechanism

Parts List:

  • 1 3/8" x 12" x 24" Lexan
  • 1 1" x 48" Aluminum Square Tubing
  • 1 1/8" x 1" x 18" Flat Aluminum
  • 1 1 1/2" x 36" Steel Square Tubing
  • 1 1 1/4" x 36" Steel Square Tubing
  • 1 1" x 36" Steel Square Tubing
  • 1 1/8" x 2" x 2" x 24" Angle Iron
  • 38 6-32 x 3/4" SS Flathead Screws
  • 3 6-32 x 1/2" SS Machine Screws
  • 3 6-32 SS washers and lock washers
  • 8 4-40 x 1/2" SS Screws
  • 8 4-40 SS washers, lock washers, and nuts
  • 2 1/4-20 x 2 3/4" SS Bolts
  • 2 1/4" dia. x 1 1/2" SS Pins
  • 12 1/4" SS Washers
  • 2 1/4" SS Lock Washers
  • 2 1/4-20 T knobs
  • 2 SS Cotter Pins
  • Misc. hardware for mounting and connecting telescoping tubing and angle iron.
Overarm Blade Guard, overall view
(Click for larger image)
Cutting and Drilling the Lexan Blade Guard (Part A)

NOTE: Lexan is sold with a protective wrapping. Leave the wrapping on to protect the Lexan against scratches when cutting. I removed the wrapping on one side of Part A (both side pieces) to mark and drill the Lexan. I was concerned that the wrapping might introduce some error.

  1. Cut the sides to the dimensions shown in Figure 2. I used double-sided tape to connect the two sides when I made the cuts. This ensured both sides would be the same dimensions.
  2. Cut out the front and rear pieces to the dimensions shown in Figure 4.
  3. Cut out the top of the blade guard to the dimensions shown in Figure 5. Cut the 45° angles in each end of the top at this time.
  4. Drill holes in the two sides to accept 6-32 stainless steel flathead screws. The hole pattern is shown in Figure 3. Do not counter sink the holes at this time. You may want to use these holes as a reference when laying out the holes for the front, rear, and top pieces.
Figure2 - Lexan Sides
(Click for Larger Image)
Figure 3 Hole Patterns
(Click for Larger Image)
Figure 4 Front & Rear Pieces
(Click for Larger Image)
Figure 5 Top Piece
(Click for Larger Image)
Note: Use a #36 drill bit (decimal equivalent is 7/64") to drill all holes that will be tapped. I used 6-32 x 3/4" stainless steel flathead screws to connect the Lexan pieces together. Drill the holes in the front, rear, and top a little deeper than required (1/2" deep). This will give you a 1/8" clearance beyond the end of the screws.
  1. Drill holes in the two front and two rear Lexan pieces to match the holes in the sides.
  2. Drill holes in the top Lexan piece to match the holes in the sides.
  3. Counter sink the holes in the two sides so the flathead screws are flush with the Lexan when seated.
  4. Tap the 38 holes in the front, rear, and top pieces with a 6-32 tap. Be sure to back the tap out after every few turns to clear the threads.
  5. Drill and tap the three holes in the top, as shown in Figure 5.
  6. Cut the 3" hole into the top, as shown in Figure 5. I used a hole cutter for this task. I practiced on a scrap piece of Lexan and did a fit check with the plastic splice to ensure the hole diameter was sized correctly. Worked for me!

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© 2003 by Ellis Walentine by special arrangement with Wayne Miller of Badger Pond. All rights reserved.
No parts of this article may be reproduced in any form or by any means
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